We are pleased to announce an Interview with artist  Elisabeth Tonnard
I first met Elisabeth Tonnard three years ago when we both were members of the ABC (Artists’ Books Cooperative). Since then I always have been a great admirer of her artist books, deep knowledge of the independent bookmaking and general wisdom as an artist.Elisabeth Tonnard is a Dutch artist and poet working in artists’ books, photography and literature. Since 2003 she has published thirty books in which texts and images extracted from the cultural archive are processed and laid out to exhibit their latent messages. The works range in scale and method from a book that iscompletely invisible, to a book containing a short story that swallowed a novel, to a book that is a swimming pool. The books are included in numerous public collections and are exhibited widely. The work has won several awards, most recently the Kleine Hans (Little Hans) Award 2013.I hope you enjoy our interview!
 1) How did you become interested in artist books?I became curious about them around 2005 or so. At that point I already had one self-published book out, and was living in The Netherlands. For a few years I had been working with texts in a way that couldn’t be placed easily in Dutch literature. I was for instance cutting in found texts, or using the correction fluid “whiteout” (in Europe called “tipp-ex”) to correct existing texts and make them into new poetry, or cutting silhouettes out of epitaphs I had photographed. It was a visual and conceptual approach to literature, and moreover it was often in the English language. I didn’t know how to position my work, what context to connect to, which was confusing. I hadn’t seen that many artist books and didn’t know anyone involved in them, but saw online that there were many activities ongoing in the US and became curious since it seemed to combine the visual and the textual. I ended up applying to the MFA program at Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, NY where the mix of attention to photography, film and artist books and the availability of some amazing archives led me to start making books in a way I never foresaw.
2) How significant have books been to your art practice?They have enabled me to have an art practice. Books to me are a very fluid and natural way of working. Somehow I am always thinking in pages, rather than for instance single images. I don’t do books on the side, making them a second-rate version of something that is supposed to be hung on a wall. Books are my main modus operandi. Even when I do make installations it comes down to pages, and seeing the whole space as a book.
3) What would it be like if Jesus had been a photographer? asks your recent book "The Gospel of the Photographer", the book has to do with photography’s hypothetical past, but do you think in it we may find its possible future?I think it is quite close to the present, showing in exaggerated form how I experience it. On the one hand a rather hysterical view of photography as a holy and magical act performed by the pompous Photographer with a capital P, on the other hand, and at the same time, the anemic flatness of photography in the situation where everything is photographed all the time and everything is as relevant as everything else. And then running in between these extremes, photography can also be a “good act”, of being involved with the world that you walk through, a reflexive deed, whether this is done through taking pictures yourself or through taking and re-using pictures from others. This good act is what the motto of the book refers to “Be on guard, keep taking photographs”. These are some of the notions in or behind the book, but it is of course also made in playfulness, seeing and testing how one can substitute just a few words in the text of the gospel and create a new world that is familiar and strange, possible and impossible at the same time.
4) The Invisible Book is one of the most perfect and rare books ever made, can you tell us more about this unique book?The book was made specifically as a product that would not have a single fault, and was available at the lowest price possible ($0). This to accommodate both the audience that expects perfectly printed and bound books, plus the audience that does not want to spend money on books (it is one of the inconveniences in publishing that these audiences oftentimes overlap). The book was also released in a limited edition of only 100 copies, in order to accommodate the discerning collector. So it was really a book that gave everybody exactly what he or she wanted. Then on the day the book was published by announcement on my website, it completely sold out because German artist Joachim Schmid ordered the entire edition. He has since then been successfully auctioning his copies on Ebay, thereby demonstrating an interesting aspect of the art market: the speculator makes money while the artist gets zero. I did make a second edition available, which was launched with a great invisible party that people attended through Facebook. This edition is also limited to 100 copies, but there is the stipulation that no one can order more than one copy.
5) What is the next direction on your bookmaking?There are a few projects that I can’t wait to get started on. One using negatives I found by accident while I was working on The Gospel of the Photographer and couldn’t locate the lantern slides I knew had to be there in the archive. The material suggests some kind of photonovel treatment. I also want to create a work based on one of the earliest photos I took. It will need to be made in a traditional darkroom, and I am considering applying to a residency in order to realize it. Then there are some ideas for textbased works. One is based on a clue that James Joyce mentions in one of his novels and that I’m hoping to expand on. Too early to tell if it will work out. I am also trying to find time to focus on my poetry in Dutch, a literary publisher is interested in publishing a collection of my work.

1、アーティストブックに興味を持ち始めたきっかけを教えて下さい。興味を持ち始めたのは2005年頃です。当時は、オランダに住んでいて自費出版した本が一冊ありました。それまで数年ほど文章を使って作業していたのですがオランダ文学とは異なるものでした。例えばどこかで見つけたテキストを切り貼りしたり、ホワイトアウト(ヨーロッパではティップエックスと言います)を既存の文章に使って新たな詩をつくったり、写真に撮った碑文を切り抜いたりしていました。文学に対して視覚的で概念的にアプローチし、さらに言うと大抵は英語を使っていました。自分の作品をどこに位置づけるべきか、どのコンテクストと結びつけて良いか分からず混乱していました。アーティストブックというものをあまり見たことがなかったし、関わっている人も知りませんでした。そんな時、ビジュアルとテキストを組み合わせる制作活動がアメリカでたくさん起こっている事をオンラインで知り興味を持ち始めました。それからすぐNY州ローチェスターにあるビジュアルスタディ・ワークショップのMFAプログラムに申し込んでしまったくらいです。そこで写真や映画、アーティストブックを混ぜ合わせることを学び、素晴らしいアーカイブコレクションに触れることで今まで自分が想像もしなかった本を作り始めるようになったのです。
2、エリザベスのアート活動の中で本はどのくらい重要ですか。本のおかげでアート制作ができていると思います。私にとって本作りはとても流動的で自然な作業です。どういうわけか私は一枚のイメージよりも常にページで物事を考えます。壁にかけるべき作品の二の次として本があるわけではなく、私の制作活動は本作りがメインなのです。それはインスタレーションをする時も同様で、空間を一冊の本として捉え、ページを組み立てながら作り上げていきます。
3、最新作「The Gospel of the Photographer (その写真家の福音書)」では、もしジーザスがフォトグラファーだったら、という仮説を投げかけています。もしそれが写真の過去だとしたら、この本から写真の未来も見つけられると思いますか。この本では、私が写真に感じることを大げさに表現しただけで、実際はいま起こっている事と非常に近いと思います。一方では、写真をまるで神聖で魔法的な行為のようにもったいぶるフォトグラファーの滑稽さを描くと同時に、もう一方では、常に何事も写真に収められ、すべてが同等に重要視されている今の世の中で気力なくしぼんでいる写真界を写し出しています。しかしこの両極端の間でも、写真(自分で撮るにせよ、他人が撮った写真を再利用するにせよ)は自分が歩世界と関わり再帰するための「良い行い」にもなり得ます。この「良い行い」こそがこの本のモットーでもある「油断せず、写真を撮り続けよ」が意味することです。この本の背後にはそういった概念がありますが、もちろんそこに遊び心を加えほんのいくつかの言葉を代用する事で既知と未知、可能と不可能が共存する新しい世界をいかにつくれるか試してみたかったのです。
4、「The Invisible Book (目に見えない本)」は非の打ち所のない稀にみる本だと思います。この本について少し聞かせて下さい。この本はとにかくなに一つ間違えのないように、そして出来るだけ安く提供できるように作りました(ゼロ円)。完璧な印刷と製本を求めているオーディエンスと、そこまで本にお金をかけたくないオーディエンス両方の要望に応えられるよう心がけました。(出版の不便の一つはこれら二つのオーディエンスがしばしば重なることです)また、この本は洞察力のあるコレクターに向け100部限定で刷ったので、あらゆる人々の要望を網羅したといっても過言ではありません。しかし、この本の出版を私のウェブサイトで発表したその日にドイツ人アーティストのヨアキム・シュミッドが全100部をオーダーしたのですぐに売り切れてしまいました。そのあと彼はこの本をEbayのオークションに出品し、アート市場の興味深い面を論証しました。それは、スペキュレーターがお金を稼ぐ間アーティストには一銭も入ってこない、という面です。私はその後セカンドエディションをつくり、増版を記念してフェイスブック上で盛大な目に見えないパーティを開催しました。これも100部限定ですが、今回は一人一冊までしか購入できないように規制しています。
5、次はどんな本を作ろうと考えていますか。早く取り掛かりたくてウズウズしているプロジェクトがいくつかあります。ひとつは、「The Gospel of the Photographer」を作っているときに偶然見つけたネガを使ったものです。ずっと探していたスライド写真がようやく見つかったので。写真小説のようなものになると思います。もうひとつは、写真を撮り始めた時の作品をもとに何か作りたいですね。それには暗室が必要なのでレジデンシーに応募しようと思っています。あとはテキストベースの作品のアイディアもいくつかあります。その一つは、ジェームス・ジョイスの小説の中に書かれた一節をもとにコンセプトを膨らませたものです。現段階ではうまくいくかまだ分かりませんが。あとは、オランダ語で書いている私の詩を出版したいと言ってくれている出版社がいるのでまとめる時間を見つけたいですね。
http://elisabethtonnard.com

We are pleased to announce an Interview with artist  Elisabeth Tonnard

I first met Elisabeth Tonnard three years ago when we both were members of the ABC (Artists’ Books Cooperative). Since then I always have been a great admirer of her artist books, deep knowledge of the independent bookmaking and general wisdom as an artist.

Elisabeth Tonnard is a Dutch artist and poet working in artists’ books, photography and literature. Since 2003 she has published thirty books in which texts and images extracted from the cultural archive are processed and laid out to exhibit their latent messages. The works range in scale and method from a book that iscompletely invisible, to a book containing a short story that swallowed a novel, to a book that is a swimming pool. The books are included in numerous public collections and are exhibited widely. The work has won several awards, most recently the Kleine Hans (Little Hans) Award 2013.

I hope you enjoy our interview!

 1) How did you become interested in artist books?

I became curious about them around 2005 or so. At that point I already had one self-published book out, and was living in The Netherlands. For a few years I had been working with texts in a way that couldn’t be placed easily in Dutch literature. I was for instance cutting in found texts, or using the correction fluid “whiteout” (in Europe called “tipp-ex”) to correct existing texts and make them into new poetry, or cutting silhouettes out of epitaphs I had photographed. It was a visual and conceptual approach to literature, and moreover it was often in the English language. I didn’t know how to position my work, what context to connect to, which was confusing. I hadn’t seen that many artist books and didn’t know anyone involved in them, but saw online that there were many activities ongoing in the US and became curious since it seemed to combine the visual and the textual. I ended up applying to the MFA program at Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, NY where the mix of attention to photography, film and artist books and the availability of some amazing archives led me to start making books in a way I never foresaw.

2) How significant have books been to your art practice?

They have enabled me to have an art practice. Books to me are a very fluid and natural way of working. Somehow I am always thinking in pages, rather than for instance single images. I don’t do books on the side, making them a second-rate version of something that is supposed to be hung on a wall. Books are my main modus operandi. Even when I do make installations it comes down to pages, and seeing the whole space as a book.

3) What would it be like if Jesus had been a photographer? asks your recent book "The Gospel of the Photographer", the book has to do with photography’s hypothetical past, but do you think in it we may find its possible future?

I think it is quite close to the present, showing in exaggerated form how I experience it. On the one hand a rather hysterical view of photography as a holy and magical act performed by the pompous Photographer with a capital P, on the other hand, and at the same time, the anemic flatness of photography in the situation where everything is photographed all the time and everything is as relevant as everything else. And then running in between these extremes, photography can also be a “good act”, of being involved with the world that you walk through, a reflexive deed, whether this is done through taking pictures yourself or through taking and re-using pictures from others. This good act is what the motto of the book refers to “Be on guard, keep taking photographs”. These are some of the notions in or behind the book, but it is of course also made in playfulness, seeing and testing how one can substitute just a few words in the text of the gospel and create a new world that is familiar and strange, possible and impossible at the same time.

4) The Invisible Book is one of the most perfect and rare books ever made, can you tell us more about this unique book?

The book was made specifically as a product that would not have a single fault, and was available at the lowest price possible ($0). This to accommodate both the audience that expects perfectly printed and bound books, plus the audience that does not want to spend money on books (it is one of the inconveniences in publishing that these audiences oftentimes overlap). The book was also released in a limited edition of only 100 copies, in order to accommodate the discerning collector. So it was really a book that gave everybody exactly what he or she wanted. Then on the day the book was published by announcement on my website, it completely sold out because German artist Joachim Schmid ordered the entire edition. He has since then been successfully auctioning his copies on Ebay, thereby demonstrating an interesting aspect of the art market: the speculator makes money while the artist gets zero. I did make a second edition available, which was launched with a great invisible party that people attended through Facebook. This edition is also limited to 100 copies, but there is the stipulation that no one can order more than one copy.

5) What is the next direction on your bookmaking?

There are a few projects that I can’t wait to get started on. One using negatives I found by accident while I was working on The Gospel of the Photographer and couldn’t locate the lantern slides I knew had to be there in the archive. The material suggests some kind of photonovel treatment. I also want to create a work based on one of the earliest photos I took. It will need to be made in a traditional darkroom, and I am considering applying to a residency in order to realize it. Then there are some ideas for textbased works. One is based on a clue that James Joyce mentions in one of his novels and that I’m hoping to expand on. Too early to tell if it will work out. I am also trying to find time to focus on my poetry in Dutch, a literary publisher is interested in publishing a collection of my work.

1、アーティストブックに興味を持ち始めたきっかけを教えて下さい。

興味を持ち始めたのは2005年頃です。当時は、オランダに住んでいて自費出版した本が一冊ありました。それまで数年ほど文章を使って作業していたのですがオランダ文学とは異なるものでした。例えばどこかで見つけたテキストを切り貼りしたり、ホワイトアウト(ヨーロッパではティップエックスと言います)を既存の文章に使って新たな詩をつくったり、写真に撮った碑文を切り抜いたりしていました。文学に対して視覚的で概念的にアプローチし、さらに言うと大抵は英語を使っていました。自分の作品をどこに位置づけるべきか、どのコンテクストと結びつけて良いか分からず混乱していました。アーティストブックというものをあまり見たことがなかったし、関わっている人も知りませんでした。そんな時、ビジュアルとテキストを組み合わせる制作活動がアメリカでたくさん起こっている事をオンラインで知り興味を持ち始めました。それからすぐNY州ローチェスターにあるビジュアルスタディ・ワークショップのMFAプログラムに申し込んでしまったくらいです。そこで写真や映画、アーティストブックを混ぜ合わせることを学び、素晴らしいアーカイブコレクションに触れることで今まで自分が想像もしなかった本を作り始めるようになったのです。

2、エリザベスのアート活動の中で本はどのくらい重要ですか。

本のおかげでアート制作ができていると思います。私にとって本作りはとても流動的で自然な作業です。どういうわけか私は一枚のイメージよりも常にページで物事を考えます。壁にかけるべき作品の二の次として本があるわけではなく、私の制作活動は本作りがメインなのです。それはインスタレーションをする時も同様で、空間を一冊の本として捉え、ページを組み立てながら作り上げていきます。

3、最新作「The Gospel of the Photographer (その写真家の福音書)」では、もしジーザスがフォトグラファーだったら、という仮説を投げかけています。もしそれが写真の過去だとしたら、この本から写真の未来も見つけられると思いますか。

この本では、私が写真に感じることを大げさに表現しただけで、実際はいま起こっている事と非常に近いと思います。一方では、写真をまるで神聖で魔法的な行為のようにもったいぶるフォトグラファーの滑稽さを描くと同時に、もう一方では、常に何事も写真に収められ、すべてが同等に重要視されている今の世の中で気力なくしぼんでいる写真界を写し出しています。しかしこの両極端の間でも、写真(自分で撮るにせよ、他人が撮った写真を再利用するにせよ)は自分が歩世界と関わり再帰するための「良い行い」にもなり得ます。この「良い行い」こそがこの本のモットーでもある「油断せず、写真を撮り続けよ」が意味することです。この本の背後にはそういった概念がありますが、もちろんそこに遊び心を加えほんのいくつかの言葉を代用する事で既知と未知、可能と不可能が共存する新しい世界をいかにつくれるか試してみたかったのです。

4、「The Invisible Book (目に見えない本)」は非の打ち所のない稀にみる本だと思います。この本について少し聞かせて下さい。

この本はとにかくなに一つ間違えのないように、そして出来るだけ安く提供できるように作りました(ゼロ円)。完璧な印刷と製本を求めているオーディエンスと、そこまで本にお金をかけたくないオーディエンス両方の要望に応えられるよう心がけました。(出版の不便の一つはこれら二つのオーディエンスがしばしば重なることです)また、この本は洞察力のあるコレクターに向け100部限定で刷ったので、あらゆる人々の要望を網羅したといっても過言ではありません。しかし、この本の出版を私のウェブサイトで発表したその日にドイツ人アーティストのヨアキム・シュミッドが全100部をオーダーしたのですぐに売り切れてしまいました。そのあと彼はこの本をEbayのオークションに出品し、アート市場の興味深い面を論証しました。それは、スペキュレーターがお金を稼ぐ間アーティストには一銭も入ってこない、という面です。私はその後セカンドエディションをつくり、増版を記念してフェイスブック上で盛大な目に見えないパーティを開催しました。これも100部限定ですが、今回は一人一冊までしか購入できないように規制しています。

5、次はどんな本を作ろうと考えていますか。

早く取り掛かりたくてウズウズしているプロジェクトがいくつかあります。ひとつは、「The Gospel of the Photographer」を作っているときに偶然見つけたネガを使ったものです。ずっと探していたスライド写真がようやく見つかったので。写真小説のようなものになると思います。もうひとつは、写真を撮り始めた時の作品をもとに何か作りたいですね。それには暗室が必要なのでレジデンシーに応募しようと思っています。あとはテキストベースの作品のアイディアもいくつかあります。その一つは、ジェームス・ジョイスの小説の中に書かれた一節をもとにコンセプトを膨らませたものです。現段階ではうまくいくかまだ分かりませんが。あとは、オランダ語で書いている私の詩を出版したいと言ってくれている出版社がいるのでまとめる時間を見つけたいですね。

http://elisabethtonnard.com

The Gospel of the Photographer by Elisabeth Tonnard
now available at the bdp store: buy it here

What would it be like if Jesus had been a photographer? What would he have done differently and which images would he have snapped? The Gospel of the Photographer imagines this possible world through a rewriting of the gospel of Mark. Words from the gospel were replaced by words connected to photography, resulting in a booby trapped text in which photography appears as an agent of miracles and healing—and announces itself ultimately as the new religion. The book includes twenty-five newly discovered photographs.

And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he took photographs. And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” And he said to them, “Let us go on to the next towns, that I may take photographs there also, for that is what I came for.” And he went throughout all Galilee, photographing in their synagogues and casting out demons.

-Elisabeth Tonnard-

The book is included in the collections of the Brooklyn Museum, the International Center of Photography Library, MoMA Library, and the New York Public Library.

We continue setting up at our new bookstore and studio location at Mana contemporary, here are some views of a beautiful print from Andrea Stern’s Assembly project.

bdp:http://store.bookdummypress.com/product/assembly-by-andrea-stern

Mana contemporary:http://www.manafinearts.com

Printed Web #1 Publisher: Paul Soulellis, Library of the Printed;  is now available at the bookdummypress store
In October 2013 I invited several web-to-print artists whose work I collect for Library of the Printed Web to contribute new work for an exhibition. The show would take the form of a 64-page publication.
The result is Printed Web #1
These are artists who sift through enormous accumulations of images and texts on the web—hunting, grabbing, compiling and publishing. Nearly all of the artists here (Mishka Henner, Joachim Schmid, Clement Valla, Benjamin Shaykin, Christian Bök, & David Horvitz, Penelope Umbrico and Chris Alexander) use the search engine for navigation and discovery, enacting a kind of performance with data.
Additionally, pivotal texts by Hito Steyerl and Kenneth Goldsmith suggest a narrative frame for examining the work.
Printed Web #1 does not define a movement or an aesthetic; rather, it implies something spatial, or a new way of working in the world. Perhaps these pages present evidence of an emerging web-to-print practice forming around the artist (as archivist), the web (as culture) and publishing (as both an old and a new schema for expressing the archive).
-Paul Soulellis-

Printed Web #1 Publisher: Paul Soulellis, Library of the Printed;  is now available at the bookdummypress store

In October 2013 I invited several web-to-print artists whose work I collect for Library of the Printed Web to contribute new work for an exhibition. The show would take the form of a 64-page publication.

The result is Printed Web #1

These are artists who sift through enormous accumulations of images and texts on the web—hunting, grabbing, compiling and publishing. Nearly all of the artists here (Mishka Henner, Joachim Schmid, Clement Valla, Benjamin Shaykin, Christian Bök, & David Horvitz, Penelope Umbrico and Chris Alexander) use the search engine for navigation and discovery, enacting a kind of performance with data.

Additionally, pivotal texts by Hito Steyerl and Kenneth Goldsmith suggest a narrative frame for examining the work.

Printed Web #1 does not define a movement or an aesthetic; rather, it implies something spatial, or a new way of working in the world. Perhaps these pages present evidence of an emerging web-to-print practice forming around the artist (as archivist), the web (as culture) and publishing (as both an old and a new schema for expressing the archive).

-Paul Soulellis-

thebookstudio:

In week #03 of my book class at ICP-Bard MFA, we looked at the Dieter Roth’s “Collected Works”. The books introduced are from a realm between original and duplication. Roth was always drawn to exceeding the limits of arts, may they be aesthetic or technical. His everlasting artistic stimulus was his curiosity for what is to be discovered when the safe and known is left behind.